Select Page

Creative Blocks and How to Get Through Them

When you rely on your creativity to pay the bills and build your reputation, you can’t afford to be short of ideas or the energy to put them into action. So, it’s no surprise that creative blocks pose a threat to artists and creative entrepreneurs being that blocks can swoop in out of nowhere and throw you off track.

 Let’s look at the various blocks and how to treat the problem areas, and get your ideas moving.

The Mental block

Trapped by your own thinking. 

With mental blocks you have narrowed your point of view, to operate from what works, playing in safety within a comfort zone. Without realizing it, you have become fixed and unable to observe or acknowledge other perspectives. Creating assumptions and limited perspective brings you to a lack of clarity.

 

Mentally blocked? Ask yourself “What if…?”, and approach various perspectives.

Immerse yourself in the new and seek opportunities that challenge you.

The Emotional block

These barriers are often hard to spot. Emotional blocks are somewhat subliminal and require some introspection and observation to see where the limitations are creating resistance. As a creative, if it’s difficult to push your work beyond visible limits. Usually fear, doubts or comforts stand in the way, resulting in procrastination manifesting in various areas.

 

Sensing an emotional block? Go within, create space that allows for observation and listening. Here you’ll see what’s in the way. Maybe there is a fear of failure, judgment or scarcity. Although you were making progress with your work, you were halted and as a result, your project never really seems to gain traction. As an artist or creative entrepreneur, emotional blocks, when overcome, create great growth; embrace the block and charge head-on. You will discover a greater you on the other side.

 

Copy Cat Block

Perhaps you discovered the routine of a creative you admire and work to incorporate their habits or style into your work in hopes to create similar successes. Contrary to your objective, you create copycat blocks that have an adverse effect where work is flat and dull in communication. Additionally, working to the routines of others can hinder you from doing your best work at times that work best for you. Functioning as a copycat creates insecurities in your work leaving you frustrated, unproductive and dependant on others to inspire your next work. 

 

Solution: First, know it’s okay to try new things and explore new ideas and concepts but be sure to not copy, learn to “Steal like an Artist” instead and when it comes to trying out new habits and routines, always step back and weigh the outcomes. Do the new habits work against you? Leaving you with low energy, too much freedom or a rigorous schedule that’s not working for you. If that’s the case create habits that work for you and create the right balance of routines, systems, and spontaneity for your creativity to thrive. What works for others may not work for you. You are the creator do your thing. 

Life block

Life offers an ebb & flow that keeps the best of us on our toes. When things start to pile up, however, creativity and drive can be hindered by breakups, unexpected hardship, moving or a loss of someone dear. Creativity demands focus. 

Life got you low? No matter what you’re facing, know that all things pass. Don’t fall into the victim trap. Channel stress in a productive manner. If you can’t, seek the support of friends and family or take a break to create space to allows for processing. Don’t fall prey to hustle culture, handle your business so you can function effectively rather than grinding for the sake of being a “hustler”. 

 

Additionally, we oftentimes see the negative, but we don’t stop long enough to count our blessings. Life’s good, it really is, despite everything. So, if life’s got you low, introspect and call on what’s good in your life. 

The Poverty Block

Time-poverty – Not enough time to create

Intellectual poverty – Not enough knowledge to support your endeavors

Resource poverty – Not enough tools to assist you in creating

Financial poverty (Our favorite) – No money, debt, poor credit

Network Poverty – Poor circle of influence

 

Need a golden ticket? Take responsibility. Acknowledge your lack of resourcefulness and accept that you can always turn it around. Evaluate where you are “lacking” and move towards creating the necessary shifts. Today, more than ever, we are offered an abundance of information and resources. You once would have to voyage or relocate to acquire the knowledge or skills now available at the push of the search button.  Don’t be distracted find ways to use what’s available. 

How do you deal with creative blocks? Which type of block do you struggle with most often? What solutions have worked with you?

 

Here’s More

Share This